Tag Archives: international law

Human Appeal Needed For Next Climate Change Treaty—Alice Huntoon

The three articles discussing climate change all point out that time is running short to address it. There is an underlying recognition of human nature and what it will take to motivate countries, who act like people, to start working on the problem of climate change with greater effort. All three articles argue that there has to be more of a human appeal rather than just scientific evidence and threat of enforcement to induce cooperation on climate change. Continue reading Human Appeal Needed For Next Climate Change Treaty—Alice Huntoon

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Common Sense Climate Change – Paul Fry

Do we need a comprehensive and binding international treaty in order to start to tackle the global issue of climate change? Of course not. Do we need the country of Lesotho to agree to chip in by reducing greenhouse gas emissions before other countries can move forward on addressing climate change? Again, of course not, and thankfully it seems that we are waking up to those simple facts.

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International Law is in the Eye of the Beholder- Caroline Courtney

When studying the formation and authorization of the International Criminal Court, it is easy to debate whether or not the court was truly designed to enforce the moral principles of the organization or to expedite the process of codifying Western ideals into international law. Despite the fact that Western legal systems are based on establishing an impartial body, it is still a a game of winner takes all.

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An Imperfect World for International Justice – Paul Fry

Let’s be honest here. In a perfect world, no prosecutor should take political factors into consideration when deciding who to investigate and who to prosecute. But we don’t live in a perfect world; far from it. Since the International Criminal Court is “the world’s most serious attempt at achieving international justice” (Bosco 1), it needs to be treated seriously. It needs to have its survival protected.

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From Deterrence to International Law. An Epic Tale of Good vs Evil (?)- Caroline Courtney

Compliance is only what states make it out to be. And in most cases, you don’t know what you’ve got until it’s gone.

For the past few decades, the US has relied on deterrence theory to legitimize its overarching authority around the world. Under the deterrence framework, the US has been a compliant member of the world system. But recently, that authority has been under severe question due to the shifting foundation of the world order towards the establishment of international law. It is important that the US begins to adapt its policies around this development or else they will lose the enormous amount of influence that they have on the current world order. Since this particular type of decline is unprecedented in US history, there is no way of predicting exactly what this could entail.

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